I love you, says dad

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Family: Kirk Dicker, diagnosed with MND in 2014, does beach patrols in an all-terrain wheelchair with his son Anthony and partner Joanna Sharp.Kirk Dicker says hewill lose his voice soon.
Nanjing Night Net

Before ithappens, the SistersBeachfatherand former Rosebery mine worker isin the process of banking his own voice.

People with motor neurone diseasemay want to bank their voicefor future usewithin high-tech augmentative and alternative communicationsystems.

“I’ve gotabout 1600 phrasestoputontoacomputer tosendto bedigitised,” he said.

”It meansI can record saying`I love you’for my five-year-old child to hear.”

Mr Dickeris determined not to let life pass by and is“livinglife to the fullest”and“creating happy memories”

“Mypriority is my family; and we all know what the end result is.I want to do things while I have the ability to do so, and cram in as much laughter and cuddles.”

Mr Dickeris one of more than 40-people in Tasmania with MND, the name given to a group of diseases in which the nerve cells controlling themuscles that enable peopleto move, speak, breathe and swallow undergo degeneration and die.

People with MNDhavean averagelife expectancy of two to five years.

As part of MND weekpeople aretelling their stories to raise awareness.

Mr Dicker and Boat Harbour Surf Lifesaving Club, where he’s a foundingmember, raisedfundsthrough theKirk Dicker Challenge Crazy Craft Raceto support MND research,hoping for a cure.

A donation was madeto the Menzies Institutewhere PhD student, Emily Handley, formerly of Boat Harbour, is looking intochanges between brain connections that take place in the early stages of fronto-temporal dementia and MND.

“I’ve beenhumbled byall the support fromthe surf club,myold workmates and the community,” Mr Dicker said.

His work mates helped renovate his house to selland the surf club raisedmoney for an all-terrain wheelchair that got him back on the beach.

Mr Dicker’s first symptoms of MND happened ona family holiday in 2013.

He found it washard to walk in thongs and hiscalf muscles were cramping.

“In the end it will stop me from breathing and this will happen with all my senses intact,” he said.

– The Advocate

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